Tips For Healthy And Young Looking Skin

Written by Catharine Paddock PhD
Skin experts say that the best way to keep your skin healthy and looking young is to protect it from the sun and not smoke: and after that, taking care with how you wash, moisturize your skin and shave also help.

According to a British Association of Dermatologists survey carried out in 2008, many Britons are unaware that sun protection can keep the skin looking younger, believing instead that applying a daily moisturizer, eating a healthy diet, drinking plenty of water and having facial massages will suffice.

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Poison in Beauty Products

Should you worry about the chemicals in your makeup, nail polish, soap and shampoo?

Some critics suspect that chemicals such as phthalates and parabens can interfere with the body’s hormones, most notably reproductive hormones such as estrogen and testosterone. The possible health risks could include chronic diseases, cancers and a host of developmental disorders and fertility problems. Continue reading

American Academy of Dermatology issues new guidelines of care for acne treatment

SCHAUMBURG, Ill. (Feb. 17, 2016) —

Acne is the most common skin condition in the United States, affecting up to 50 million people every year. Fortunately for these patients, there are several treatment options available to help them manage their condition, as outlined in the American Academy of Dermatology’s new “Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris.” Published online in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology on Feb. 17, the evidence-based guidelines cover acne treatment recommendations for both adolescents and adults. Continue reading

The Benefits of Online Learning

I strongly believe that the future of higher education lies with online learning. Increasingly, colleges and university students now find themselves with other obligations beyond that of getting a degree. Jobs and family commitments make equal demands on their time. Having the option of taking online classes and studying on their own time is critically important. At the same time, many state institutions are unable to accommodate all those who want to take classes on campus, escalating the demand for online learning. Continue reading

The Global Evolution of Aesthetics

Julia Pettis , BS. FACHE
Academic Dean College of Medical Aesthetics
School of Aesthetic Dermatology Nursing
California U.S.A

In the last 25 years there has been an explosion of equipment and cosmeceutical skin care products introduced to medical professionals, medical spas and wellness resorts. Fueled by more wealth, longer life expectancy and a youth oriented culture, there is an overwhelming consumer demand for anti-aging and wellness therapies. The global economic changes and rising consumer incomes are driving the global beauty care industry, which is forecasted to reach $265 billion by 2017. Emerging economics such as India, China, South Korea, and Brazil offer high growth opportunities for players operating in the medical aesthetics market.

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5 Things Dermatologists Shouldn’t Do

Gary Goldenberg, MD; Stephanie Cajigal

In October 2013, the American Academy of Dermatology released a list of 5 skin tests and procedures that dermatologists should avoid. The Academy followed in the footsteps of 42 other specialty societies that have published similar lists as part of the ABIM Foundation’s “Choosing Wisely” campaign, which is meant to encourage physicians to question the benefit of some commonly used tests and procedures.

Medscape Dermatology Board Member Gary Goldenberg, MD, offered his perspective on what these recommendations mean for clinical practice. Continue reading

Cosmetic Face ‘Fillers’ Can Go Wrong, FDA Warns- NBC News

Article by NBCNews

Cosmetic facial fillers, which can plump thin lips or erase wrinkles, can go badly and tragically wrong, the Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday.

If the materials used to fill the skin get into a blood vessel, they can cause a stroke, blindness, or kill off big patches of skin, the FDA says in a new warning.

“Unintentional injection can block blood vessels and restrict blood supply to tissues,” the FDA says in its warning to consumers and doctors. “Soft tissue fillers should be injected only by health care providers who have appropriate training and experience and who are knowledgeable about the anatomy at and around the injection site,” it adds.
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Should we change laws pertaining to oversight of nurse practitioners, especially in states with rural populations?

In American cities and suburbs, patients have many choices when it comes to health care providers. In rural areas of the U.S., patients have to travel long distances to meet with primary care physicians and perhaps even farther for specialists. Options closer to home sometimes include nurse practitioners. However, even though they are licensed and trained to perform a wide variety of primary care services, state laws sometimes prevent them. This is part of an ongoing debate in the U.S. about how to ensure patients are receiving the best possible care.

Facial Aesthetics (Botox, Dermal Fillers, Collagen Products) – Global Pipeline Analysis, Competitive Landscape and Market Forecasts to 2017

GlobalData
March 31, 2011
69 Pages – SKU: GBDT6234307

Countries covered: Global

Facial Aesthetics (Botox, Dermal Fillers, Collagen Products) – Global Pipeline Analysis, Competitive Landscape and Market Forecasts to 2017

Summary
GlobalData’s new report, “Facial Aesthetics (Botox, Dermal Fillers, Collagen Products) – Global Pipeline Analysis, Competitive Landscape and Market Forecasts to 2017” provides key data, information and analysis on the global facial aesthetics market. The report provides market landscape, competitive landscape and market trends information on the facial aesthetics market. The report provides comprehensive information on the key trends affecting the market, and key analytical content on the market dynamics. The report also reviews the competitive landscape and technology offerings.

This report is built using data and information sourced from proprietary databases, primary and secondary research and in-house analysis by GlobalData’s team of industry experts.

Scope

  • Key geographies covered include the US, the UK, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Japan, China, India, Australia, and Brazil.
  • Key segments covered include botulinum toxin, hyaluronic acid, particle and polymer fillers, and collagens.
  • Annualized market revenues data for 2010, forecast forward for 7 years to 2017. Company shares data for 2010.
  • Qualitative analysis of key market trends, market drivers, and restraints by each category within facial aesthetics market.
  • The report also covers information on the leading market players, the competitive landscape, and the leading pipeline products and technologies.
  • Key players covered include Allergan, Q-Med AB, Mentor Corporation, Medicis and BioForm Medical.

Reasons to buy

  • Develop business strategies by understanding the trends and developments that are driving the facial aesthetics market globally.
  • Design and develop your product development, marketing and sales strategies.
  • Develop market-entry and market expansion strategies.
  • Identify key players best positioned to take advantage of the emerging market opportunities.
  • Exploit in-licensing and out-licensing opportunities by identifying products, most likely to ensure a robust return.
  • What’s the next big thing in the facial aesthetics market landscape? – Identify, understand and capitalize.
  • Make more informed business decisions from the insightful and in-depth analysis of the global facial aesthetics market and the factors shaping it.

Additional Information

GlobalData’s new report, “Facial Aesthetics (Botox, Dermal Fillers, Collagen Products) – Global Pipeline Analysis, Competitive Landscape and Market Forecasts to 2017” provides key data, information and analysis on the global facial aesthetics market. The report provides market landscape, competitive landscape and market trends information on the facial aesthetics market. The report provides comprehensive information on the key trends affecting the market, and key analytical content on the market dynamics. The report also reviews the competitive landscape and technology offerings.

This report is built using data and information sourced from proprietary databases, primary and secondary research and in-house analysis by GlobalData’s team of industry experts

The Global Facial Aesthetics Market to Reach $4 Billion by 2017

Facial Aesthetics Market, Global, Overall Revenue ($bn), 2010-2017

Source: GlobalData, Secondary Research and Interviews with Industry Experts and Key Opinion Leaders

The global market for facial aesthetics is forecast to reach about $4 billion in 2017 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 9%. The growth is expected to be driven by minimally invasive and non-invasive procedures that offer long term results at competitive pricing. The Botulinum toxin market is expected to maintain the lead in terms of market share, in spite of its high side effects profile. This is due to advantages such as better patient comfort, short procedure times and faster results. Hyaluronic acid based dermal fillers are primarily driven by their low side effects profile. The results of hyaluronic acid based fillers (HA fillers) are short term (three to six months) and as a result recurring income for physicians and aesthetic centers encourages growth of this segment. The particle and polymer fillers market will register lower growth rates compared to Botulinum toxin and HA fillers. Focus of companies on lower side effects profile and longevity of aesthetic results of up to two years encourage the future growth of this segment. Loss of recurring income due to long term results discourages physicians and aesthetic centers to suggest polymer fillers for their patients. Collagen products will experience continue to experience decline in the sales as it has been the historic trend.This is due to reasons such as increasing awareness about botulinum toxin and HA fillers and their reducing price trends.

The US to Continue as the Biggest Facial Aesthetics Market

Facial Aesthetics Market, US and Other Countries Contribution (%), 2010

Source: GlobalData, Secondary Research and Interviews with Industry Experts and Key Opinion Leaders

The US contribution towards the global facial aesthetics market was valued at 39% in 2009. The US facial aesthetics market is forecast to reach $1.7 billion in 2017, with a CAGR of 11%. The market is expected to be driven by the popularity of botulinum toxin and hyaluronic acid based dermal fillers used for facial rejuvenation. Inception of DYSPORT from Medicis in mid-2009 is likely to affect Allergan’s domination for botulinum toxin products in the US. The competition has also resulted in decreasing price trends in the US and as a result will encourage new patients to go for botulinum toxin procedures. The market is also expected to be driven by an increasing number of providers, such as Merz Pharmaceuticals, diversifying into botulinum toxin based products and dermal fillers. The direct to consumer marketing approach of the companies is expected to increase awareness about facial aesthetics in the US. Non-invasive dermal fillers such as hyaluronic acid formulated with anesthetic lidocaine are being predominantly used in the US, which will drive the market for facial aesthetics in the US.

Allergan Dominates the Global Facial Aesthetics Market

Facial Aesthetics Market, Company Share, 2010

Source: GlobalData, Secondary Research and Interviews with Industry Experts and Key Opinion Leaders

Allergan dominates the global facial aesthetics market with 68% of the market share in 2010. This is mainly driven by factors such as Allergan’s dominance in botulinum toxin (botox) and wide presence in all the market’s countries across all segments. Allergan holds 80% market share in the botulinum toxin segment, while Medicis holds 16%. Medicis is expected to increase its market share in the botulinum toxin segment since its product DYSPORT is becoming popular due to its cost effectiveness and results comparable to Allergan’s BOTOX Cosmetic. Medicis has presence only in the US and has a 40% market share in hyaluronic acid based dermal fillers in the US. Q-Med AB does not have presence in the botulinum toxin segment. However Q-Med AB has a market share of 41% worldwide in the dermal fillers market, which includes HA fillers and polymer fillers. Q-Med AB is followed by Allergan with a market share of 35%. Allergan is expected to maintain its lead in terms of market share but the gap is expected to narrow due to an increasing number of providers. Increasing competition also is expected to lead to a decreasing price trend in the facial aesthetics market.

Botulinum Toxin Market is Forecast to Reach $2.5 Billion by 2017

The botulinum toxin (Botox) market is forecast to reach $2.5 billion in 2017 at a CAGR of 9%. The growth in the BOTOX market is expected to be the fastest among all the segments in the facial aesthetics market. The US will continue to be the largest market for BOTOX in the future. The BOTOX market is driven by factors such as low procedure time and cost effectiveness of the procedure. Chronic facial wrinkles can be treated using botulinum toxin unlike other anti wrinkle procedures. It is the most effective non surgical anti wrinkle solution available in the facial aesthetics market. It is possible to get rid of age old facial lines and wrinkles in just five to 10 minutes while it is not the case with other procedures. Also the uniqueness of botulinum toxin is the wide spectrum of treatment that it provides. It can be used for forehead wrinkles, eyelids, lips and the neck. The results of botulinum toxin procedure are not permanent, due to which the side effects are also not permanent. This is due to the fact that the ingredients used in botulinum toxin degrade over a period of time that not only results in temporary results but also the side effects that do not last long The future market is expected to be robust with more prominent players such as Medicis and Merz Pharmaceuticals coming up with their versions of botulinum toxin at a cheaper price. In 2009, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had given directions to all the manufacturers of botulinum toxin to come up with a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS). This is to create more awareness among the patients and the physicians about the risk involved in using botulinum toxin when it spreads beyond the injection site.

Focus on Permanency of Results from Facial Aesthetic Procedures with Low Side Effects Profile will Fuel Long Term Growth

Currently facial aesthetic procedures do not provide permanent results. The result lasts for a maximum time frame of two years. The longevity of the results comes with higher side effects profile. HA fillers do not have any side effects unlike botulinum toxin or particle and polymer fillers. However the results from HA fillers last from six to twelve months. Particle and polymer fillers provide results that last up to two years but with higher side effects profile. Botulinum toxin provides results that last only up to six months. This requires the patients to undergo multiple treatments that can prove to be expensive. Hence the long term growth of this market depends on the focus of companies in this market to increase the longevity of the results from facial injectables. Longevity of results should not compromise on the safety of these products. Natural results with lower side effects profile are most desired. This will significantly increase the number of patients opting for facial aesthetic procedures. Permanency of the results may affect the recurring revenue of the physicians carrying out these procedures in the short term perspective. However longevity of the results will bring effective penetration of facial aesthetic procedures.

How the sun sees you

Please call Newport Aesthetics for a free Sunscreen Consultation at 949-748-6253.

Cancer experts and dermatologists have told us many times that too much unprotected exposure to the sun and its ultraviolet rays will damage our skin and put us at a greater risk for developing skin cancer. Even normal, daily exposure to the sun on our faces harms our skin and ages us prematurely. And a new video may prove just that.

Artist and videographer Thomas Leveritt hit the streets with a camera that can capture ultraviolet light to show people what they can’t see. What’s revealed is the damage the sun has done to their skin that’s invisible to us because our eyes can’t see ultraviolet light. He also captured the skin of children to show how our skin starts fresh and gets damaged over time.

The video also shows just how good sunscreen is at blocking ultraviolet rays. When participants put on sun block, their skin turned black, showing that the ultraviolet rays were not getting through. According to Leveritt, “We showed people what they looked like in ultraviolet and wondered aloud if they wanted to put on some damn sunscreen already.”

Perhaps it’s time to apply sunscreen in front of a camera that senses ultraviolet light—that way we’d know we’re getting good coverage and protection.